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What Happens if I Vote For or Against the Constitution?

July 12, 0001 / July 27, 2017

At her live Q&A session last week, Lena De Winne, the CEO and Vice-President of Asgardia NGO, provided an analogy to answer this question. “There is a saying – don’t confuse tourism and immigration,” she said.

She compared citizens of Asgardia – those who accepted the Constitution – to legal residents of a country, and those who chose not to support the Constitution – to tourists.

“If you like a country, if you want to live there, if you want to be part of that system, it’s only natural that you abide by the established regulations in that country,” she explained. “And in most countries, that would be the Constitution. Anybody in the first 100,000 will have the right and are welcome to exercise the right to get Asgardia’s citizenship for free.”

“Citizens are those who support the Constitution, the basic makeup of the country. So, we consider those who have voted for the Constitution citizens as in when, for example, a referendum was happening on whatever might be the subject, these people are entitled to vote. As far as we are concerned, they have declared that they are supporting Asgardia, so their vote counts when decisions are to be made,” De Winne explained.

Citizens of Asgardia have the right to receive Asgardia’s documents for free; upload their files to Asgardia-1 and future satellites without charge; nominate themselves for leadership and Parliamentary positions; work in the government and become local representatives. Citizens can bring forth petitions, including those to update the Constitution.

As for the future, she said, “After the first 100,000 is done, the voting will continue, and every new person who is applying has to provide a certain amount of data about himself or herself, and then has to vote or not to vote on the Constitution.” Those who accept the Constitution after the voting is closed will be considered applicants for Asgardian citizenship.

If a person does not accept the Constitution, they will still stay a registered Asgardian and participate in forum discussions, for example. The difference, De Winne said, is that “by doing so that person either says 'I am interested in becoming a citizen,' or 'I’m visiting your Asgardian nation as a tourist'.”

You asked, Asgardia answered. For more answers to questions you may have, please see our Frequently Asked Questions .

Vladimir Onoprienko

резюме исчерпывающее ситуацию--“Есть такая поговорка – не путайте туризм и иммиграцию”, - сказала она.

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Vladimir Onoprienko

ещё есть такое выражение-в чужой монастырь со своим уставом не ходят

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goettin eirene

Thank you for the detailed info. I'm sure also dummies will understand it.And when not,then they want not understand.

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Baitang
你们不懂什么是国家!一个国家需要团结才可以强盛!而不是小部分人制定的规则!一个游客可以轻易的说yes 一个有思想的人会说NO 如果你只是想听yes 那就多招些游客吧! -------------- You don't know what a country is! A nation needs unity to make it strong! Not the rules that a small number of people make! A visitor can easily say "yes" A thoughtful person would say "NO". If you just want to listen to yes, do more tourists!
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ChrisStygander

However, there are those who believe the current constitution is poorly written and will lead to a totalitarian state within minutes of asgardias foundation, and you give no "I do not accept this constitution" and are requirng a less than 50% vote this nation is doomed from the start due to lack of care by the ngo and the administration


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Asgardian 852278

Esto es un Fraude en la elección de la constitución solo puedes votar si , llego la fecha de finalizar elecciones y alargaron el tiempo hasta conseguir los 100.000 votos que necesitaban pero no contaron a los otros que no votaron. Si se diera el caso de que esto fuera Verdad sea Claramente una DICTADURA COMUNISTA . Solo un idiota Votaría Si por una Constitución así de MALA.

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Elzic

I strongly disagree with this message. Acceptance being the only way to participate in policy making is offensive to the very idea of democracy. What you are essentially saying is that the proposed constitution CANNOT fail because anyone who doesn't like it doesn't qualify for citizenship. I didn't abstain because I don't want to be a part of Asgardia, I abstained because the constitution has more holes in it than a clarinet made of swiss cheese.

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Khaiharlock

I believe the initial purpose of accepting the constitution (in whatever draft form) was to indicate solidarity with the concept and dream of what Asgardia could be and do for the future of earth and its inhabitants of all species.

I believe the idea is that those who have formally accepted the constitution; would then be the founding stakeholders entitled to vote for or against and/or ammend or ratify any propsed changes to such a constitution; With the goal of possessing at any one time the best representation and interests and defences and rightsand obligations of Asgardia's citizens and the Nation while fulfilling its vision.

Enlighten me if i stand corrected in my assumptions.

Open discource and postive exchanges of ideas are always welcome in seeking mutual understanding.

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Elzic

If that is its purpose, then they should say that it is a gesture of solidarity and agreement to the concept. What you are describing would be more in line with the US's declaration of independence than the constitution. I think that your idea is a great one, but I believe that people should be let in on the participation process before there is a discussion about what the constitution should say.

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GzeshA

A Little bit of American history.

We had the Articles of Confederation. It was the very first American document that detailed laws and government roles. Then the Whiskey Rebellion occurred because the Articles of Confederation were essentially too weak. Out of that, we got our current document of laws and regulations, The United States Constitution. Sure it's not perfect, and new legislation get added every couple of decades or so, but it's survived about 200 years now. The NGO needs to take a look at history and legislations from around the world to get an idea of what a constitution should be like for the people. Personally, I think we should do the American thing which has the Bill of Rights (10 Amendments and an elastic clause). In the Bill of Rights we get our inalienable rights, and from there have the public vote for new laws. Since the country is still small-ish, I believe we're 108th in world population, Direct Democracy could work, but when the population keeps rising we'll have to figure out a more efficient way of voting.

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GzeshA

A Little bit of American history.

We had the Articles of Confederation. It was the very first American document that detailed laws and government roles. Then the Whiskey Rebellion occurred because the Articles of Confederation were essentially too weak. Out of that, we got our current document of laws and regulations, The United States Constitution. Sure it's not perfect, and new legislation get added every couple of decades or so, but it's survived about 200 years now. The NGO needs to take a look at history and legislations from around the world to get an idea of what a constitution should be like for the people. Personally, I think we should do the American thing which has the Bill of Rights (10 Amendments and an elastic clause). In the Bill of Rights we get our inalienable rights, and from there have the public vote for new laws. Since the country is still small-ish, I believe we're 108th in world population, Direct Democracy could work, but when the population keeps rising we'll have to figure out a more efficient way of voting.

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