Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
A rotating wheel or many rotating wheels should make up the space station while spinning on their axis to simulate Earths gravity at 9.807 m/s2. This way, many negative affects of space could be prevented. Keeping the citizens on board healthy and with proper bone density and connectivity, while also preventing bird leg syndrome.
Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
I read a recent artice that alot of astro/cosmonauts suffer from sight problems after spending a ong time in space. Something to do with the pressure of liquid in the head and eyes.
Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
Yes, vision loss has been experienced by 20% of astronauts. This is thought to be caused by increased intracranial pressure caused by shifts in bodily fluids from the lower extremities to the upper part of the body, due to micro-gravity. The artificial gravity generated by the rotation of the wheel ...
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
There is not any question about people needing gravity when living in space for long periods of time, e.g., many years. There are many questions about how much is necessary. That cannot be answered on Earth, only by going to Mars or trying various g levels in orbit. There is ...
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
In regards to the Mars gravity, wouldn't a 2-tiered rotating station accomplish both objectives at the same time? For example, following the single wheel station theory, a smaller ring located closer to the center of rotation would rotate at the same speed as the outer ring in regards to rpm, ...
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
The wheel idea is one of the best ideas out there about generating gravity. The situation is that the material for making those stations have an issue: The forces of being rotating constantly make the needs of stronger materials and this, al most all times, make material heavier and launching ...
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
For a start, you don't lift the material into space, you take it from up there. Weight becomes less of an issue. Making these materials in space both simultainously avoids the need to waste energy then figthing Earth's gravity, and using the infinite resources of the solar system, there's less ...
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
the issue with taking the materials from "up there" is that we would need a mining, refining, AND manufacturing station already in space to allow for the processing and refining of raw materials, which would actually cost the Asgardian project more money to get established then what the multiple launch ...
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
How are you going to control this wheel? People moving from one part of the wheel to another, liquids, gases and so on - mass center will change it's position constantly. As a result we'll get an object that needs tons of fuel every minute to stabilize itself. Just roughly ...
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
The problem of Artificial Gravity is almost certainly one of the first things we need to solve. We know lots about living in zero g and the damage it causes, we also know a fair bit about living at 1g and the health benefits gained. Anything in between....zilch! So, we ...
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
Volia I can agree with the nuclear reactor being a main contributor to the power grid, and have even found studies showing that the CO2 emissions from the reactor can be recycled into a fuel source as well, allowing for less wasted material. As far as the mass of people ...
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
pwmmal, Does nuclear reactor produce CO2?
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
Volia, http://www.world-nuclear.org/nuclear-basics/greenhouse-gas-emissions-avoided.aspx I apologize for posting links to third party sites, but they can sum it up better than I. Even though nuclear power produces far lower amounts of CO2 than most other fuel sources, there is still enough to be considered emissions, which can then be recycled.
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
pwmmal, I'm sorry, but can you share the link where is written - how does nuclear reactor produce CO2? Normally nuclear energy produce heat, that is used to warm water to steam that is used to run the electric generator. P.S.: I'm not a nuclear engineer, just a space one.
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
I don't know what nuclear reactors have to do with artificial gravity. In space we will have sunlight 24/7, so I don't see why we would use nuclear reactors unless we place our habitat outside the orbit of Mars. Artificial gravity can be induced by spinning the habitat. The inside ...
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
I don't know what nuclear reactors have to do with artificial gravity. In space we will have sunlight 24/7, so I don't see why we would use nuclear reactors unless we place our habitat outside the orbit of Mars. Artificial gravity can be induced by spinning the habitat. The inside ...
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
umm Take many low weight trips with dropships using the method of virgin galactic. Then assemble the shipyard/processing plant overtime. When it is ready start building near earth asteroid mining vessels to increase production of more mining ships use extra materials to build more warehouses and production facilities
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
Please, please, stop referring to this as artificial gravity. It's actually simulated gravity. It just feels like gravity, but it's not.
Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
Volia, I apologize, after further reading I found that you are correct, nuclear reactors don't produce CO2 emissions during operation. JOQuantaman, Earlier in the discussion we were talking about the amount of solar panels you would need in order to generate the electricity needed to power a station of significant ...
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
http://i67.tinypic.com/2598ktd.jpg this is just an idea of how the station might look. using the outer ring for a 1G environment, while the inner ring can be for low gravity conditioning and a midway point for central power maintenance at the core. I think we could develop a transit system in ...
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
The problem of stabilization can be solved using mobile masses inside of the spokes of the wheel, they will be moved to leave the centre of mass at the "centre" of the station. I'm an Italian guy, sorry for my english
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
I did some numbers in regards to size, RPMs, and average height (of a person), and this is what I have come up with so far, sorry in advance for the short hand. And if anyone has anything to add to it, or sees where I might have gotten something ...
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
Oh guys, I read this and all ideas are to old and not usable. We need modern approach for this to work. For example 2 tubes filed with plasma rotating in opposite direction will make magnetic-electric field in the shape of torus and this is enough to have gravity and ...
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Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
It's not about what is new or old, but what works and is efficient. That and copying nature isn't exactly a NEW process.
Jun 24, 01 / Jun 13, 17 09:25 UTC
>make material heavier and launching to the space those heavy materials means a lot of money. This is an effectively one-time cost that reduces a permanent variable cost in health care. Whatever the particulars, we'll save money in the long term by having a simulated gravity system. The bigger issue ...
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