Gem 00, 01 / Apr 22, 17 22:10 UTC

Energy?  

How will us asgardians, get the energy that we use on a daily basis. (after we have settled in space) and how will/ what will make/get our energy from? For example, Wind, Solar, or water power?

Gem 01, 01 / Apr 23, 17 04:23 UTC

Hey @bobtheslob...personally, I think we'll be getting a lot of energy from solar panel systems. There's some great topics I keep watching on EM drive power, and possible fusion power. We'll have to see where that goes. 

[MOD] question, though...I'm curious how this topic fits into the 'Ministry of Justice -- Constitution' category? Let me know if we could move it to an area in the sciences? There's quite a few topics already there regarding energy, power, propulsion.

Thanks, Leo

Gem 01, 01 / Apr 23, 17 11:56 UTC

There's no wind in space, well, not the kind you are used to on Earth. And water either freezes in the depths of space, or evaporate in the Sun. 

Solar power is the most intuitive source of energy, since the base could be made to have an orbit free from Earth's shadow (such as a Lagrangian point), and there's no clouds in space so sunlight there is constant. 

Can 03, 01 / May 23, 17 17:50 UTC

From physical vacuum. The physical vacuum exists in all points of the University and can be used for generation of energy. The density of vacuum energy exceeds the energy of Sun billion of billions times. And mechanical traction could be also generated with the help of vacuum.

Can 23, 01 / Jun 12, 17 00:48 UTC

My question is if the fuel cell reaction is possible at high temperature 800+ degrees C? If yes we could use temperature(that is a problem in space) to generate energy. The second question if electrolisis is higher efficient with with water at high temperature 200-300 degrees C? If i'm right at high temperature the effeciency of electrolisis can be higher than 1(for electricity)? let's say 2H2O + e + t1 = 4 H + 2 O  than we will have a tempreture to power pump.

  Last edited by:  Victor Kuryshev (Asgardian, Candidate)  on Can 23, 01 / Jun 12, 17 00:48 UTC, Total number of edits: 1 time

Vir 09, 01 / Jul 24, 17 03:37 UTC

Our energy can come from any number of things. All ranging from solar power to every move we make such as stepping. It may only create a small amount of power but if that power was stored up along with solar, bio, and even nuclear forms of power, the stations power would rise over time and eventually generate enough power to run everything. Never think of just one way to do something when there are many ways to do so.

Sag 10, 01 / Nov 14, 17 16:55 UTC

Solar energy at the earth sun distance in space is some 1400 watts per square meter. We currently can harvest only a fraction of this with current technology (some 20% or so). Even so, large arrays and concentrators can be made to intensify this light, and prism like lensing can move more of the light to a useful frequency to solar cells. Concentrators can also be used to heat a liquid (water and some low melting point metals and other liquids like ammonia) and this can be used for running turbines. There are a lot of choices in design, and many should be tested and shaken out for viability.

Sag 20, 01 / Nov 24, 17 22:49 UTC

  • Whilst solar power is arguably the cleanest source in space, powering large stations wouldn't be feasible without having solar farms twice as large.

    I think a more viable option would be nuclear fission, it is a clean source of power that produces heat; which is something we need on a space station.
    It is not dependent on uncontrollable conditions (such as the wind or the time of day).

Cons:
- Costly
- Radioactive waste
- Non-renewable
- Needs to be large to be efficient
Might be renewable due to the by product of plutonium, which itself is also fissionable
Pros:
- Creates a great amount of power
- Generates heat, (heat is good in the coldness of space)

In conclusion. The technology is young and controversial, but to lift our feet off the ground, nuclear fission, might be the way forward.

Sag 21, 01 / Nov 25, 17 17:23 UTC

I guess a steam-engine could work in space.

Grtz, Dirk.

Sag 21, 01 / Nov 25, 17 17:50 UTC

Using a steam engine wouldn't be a good idea.

A steam engine is used by inputting high pressured steam into a piston and generating kinetic energy, I feel your proposal to use a steam engine would be based on the idea of then having that kinetic energy be converted into electrical via turbine.
By the time you have the high pressured steam you would be better off just using the heat source for the steam as a power source itself. There is also the problem of the plenum exhaust, lubrication requirements, doing all of this in space and other reasons why we no longer use this technology.

Cap 01, 01 / Dec 3, 17 04:43 UTC

Cosmic energy. Neutrino is the closest candidate.

Cap 06, 01 / Dec 8, 17 17:54 UTC

J'ai une idée d'une centrale électrique à vide

Cap 06, 01 / Dec 8, 17 18:43 UTC

Welcome lionel45, 

I was wondering something in that way. Would an electric motor work in space?
If so there could be build plain factory's in space and the workers could be robots.

Grtz, Dirk.

Cap 10, 01 / Dec 12, 17 18:54 UTC

Земля имеет мощные радиационные пояса, в которых, вероятно, не стоит размещать пилотируемой станции.Но может использовать энергию этих рек элементарных частиц  концентрируя их  с помощью  огромных зеряженых сетей (электростатические линзы) .Еще это может быть сделано с солнечным ветром.И с радиационными поясами юпитера-а то и солнца.В дополнение, особенно возле солнца-число атомов в возбужденном состоянии очень велико отсюда идея солнечного лазера с  короной солнца в качестве рабочего тела и отражателя --- что-то вроде  нескольких зеркал из металлизированной пленки.

Earth has a powerful radiation belts, in which, probably, do not place a manned station.But can use the energy of these rivers elementary particles and concentrating them with a huge ceragenix networks (electrostatic lens) .Even this can be done with the solar wind.And radiation belts of Jupiter and the sun.In addition, especially near the sun number of atoms in the excited state is very large hence the idea of solar laser solar corona as a working body and reflector --- like several mirrors from metallic film.

  Last edited by:  Rem Krivonos (Asgardian)  on Cap 12, 01 / Dec 14, 17 15:53 UTC, Total number of edits: 1 time

Aqu 20, 02 / Jan 20, 18 11:56 UTC

我很赞成能源问题。这也是困惑了我们人类很久的问题。一个文明要想迈入星际时代对能源的利用,同样也要达到对应水平。我个人认为比较看好的就是核能。虽然大家有可能会谈核色变,但是不可否认的是他是这个时代最有可能,也是最高效的能源。其次是解决动力问题。虽然我们能够利用核能但是在动力方面确是很落后。通过火箭发射送往太空的效率实在很底下,而且成功很高,如果有一种高效的运输的方式那么我们进入星际大航海时代的时间会大大的减少。关键1如何解决核能在太空的稳定性   关键2如何解决高效的运输方式  关键3  如何解决太空中的生态圈模拟问题  

I am in favor of energy issues. This is also a matter that puzzles us for so long. If a civilization wants to enter the interstellar space for energy use, it must also reach the corresponding level. I personally think that is more optimistic about nuclear energy. Although we may talk about nuclear discoloration, it is undeniable that he is the most likely and most efficient energy source of this era. The second is to solve the motive force problem. Although we can use nuclear energy, it is indeed very backward in terms of power. The efficiency of launching into space through rocket launches is very low and highly successful. With an efficient means of transportation, the time we enter the Star Trek era will be greatly reduced. Key 1 How to Solve the Stability of Nuclear Energy in Space Key 2 How to Solve the Efficient Way of Transportation Key 3 How to Solve the Ecosystem Simulation Problem in Space

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  Last edited by:  Cpt Lorca (Asgardian)  on Pis 00, 02 / Jan 28, 18 01:29 UTC, Total number of edits: 1 time
Reason: Google translation added by Denise Blair 28/01/2018 @0127 UTC